Archive for the ‘interview’ Tag

jumping clapping man: 2010 in Review, A Blog Assessment

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how jumping clapping man did in 2010, and here’s some interesting data on how the year looked!:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow!

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

Madison Square Garden can seat 20,000 people for a concert. jcm was viewed about 68,000 times in 2010. If it were a concert at Madison Square Garden, it would have performed about
3 times.

In 2010, I had 85 new posts, growing the total archive to 170 posts. I uploaded 265 pictures, taking up a total of 45mb. (That’s about 5 pictures per week.)

The busiest day of the year was February 16th with 1,469 views. The most popular post that day was Olympic Reigns Ending: Likelihoods or Naysaying?.

Where did they come from?


My top referring sites in 2010 were loopaxles.blogspot.com, parterre.com, requiredelements.com, en.wordpress.com, and lifeskate.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for cheeseburger, olympics 2010,
2010 olympics, vancouver olympics, and cheese burger. (“Cheeseburger”?…REALLY?!)

Attractions in 2010


These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Olympic Reigns Ending: Likelihoods or Naysaying? July 2009
1 comment

2

“Cheese Berger” July 2009
2 comments

3

jcm’s ‘10 Olympics’ Podium Predictions Contest January 2010
42 comments

4

Missteps, Falls & Wet Tushes March 2009

5

Heidi Melton: The Official Berlin E-Interview January 2010
6 comments

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Heidi Melton: The Official Berlin E-Interview

Since I first sang the praises of my friend, soprano Heidi Melton on jcm, she has moved several steps closer to the exposure that her prodigious gifts hinted at. I’m very excited to share with you (Melton fans and newbies alike) my new e-interview with her: she, in Berlin, sidled up to her laptop with frosty brew-in-hand, and me, in San Francisco, eagerly awaiting her return to SFO, in 2011. Ah, it’s the next best thing to sitting down in-person at a pub!

It’s not surprising that, despite the 5,657 miles between us, her appeal, warmth, irrepressible sense of humor, and passion for her art still shine through. Enjoy this glimpse into her life, career and heart…

Photo: Kristin Hoebermann

jcm: What is your very first memory of singing or performing?

HM: I suppose that my first memory of music would be of my grandma sitting next to me on the piano bench, teaching me how to play. It is how I spent the majority of my formative years, and was very gratifying.

jcm: Are you from a musical family? Or, were your gifts helped along in any way in your childhood home?

HM: My family has always loved music, although not necessarily opera. But, they have really started finding an appreciation for it — except for my sister, who still feels that opera sounds like someone is stepping on nails! My grandma went to college for piano performance, so that was always a part of my home, but I will admit to not really discovering opera until I was about 14 or 15.

jcm: Have you always been on track to be a performer, and when did your trajectory shift towards opera?

HM: When I first started applying to undergraduate schools, I did so under music performance and music education. I applied mostly to state schools in Washington, but I had my one “pie in the sky” school, which was the Eastman School of Music. I was accepted into Eastman, but only as a music education major. I wasn’t good enough to get into their performance program. Anyhow, I’ve never been good at accepting a “no,” so I worked hard and juried into performance, and haven’t looked back.

jcm: When did it become clear that your voice was that very special and true dramatic soprano, like one of your favorites, Régine Crespin, or perhaps even a Hochdramatische (“heroic”), like another favorite, Astrid Varnay? Is it a pressure, or instead empowering to know you hold this rare gift?

HM: It does seem to be heading in that direction, doesn’t it? I do consider it a gift, and with any gift comes responsibility, so I am just trying to do all that I can to ensure that I give “the beast” everything that it needs to be the best it can be. But to answer your question, it is both a pressure and empowering.

Continue reading interview —>